Wednesday, December 13, 2006
Nezha's Chess: Move by Move
Some games you don't know how you won. Some games you don't know how you lost. But in some rare instance, you win knowing exactly what you did. This is one of those games. If there ever was a game that can be termed as a "textbook" win, this will be it. Good bishops, bad bishops, weak pawns. Such elementary positional concepts rarely appear with such clarity in my games.

So in memory of this event, i am now giving you the game along with my comments, move-by-move style.

But why waste words? Accompany me my dear reader as I take you into a journey of spiritual profundity (If you're wondering why I write like this, all i can say is thanks Nimzovich)

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5



The Caro-Kann. Personally i don't like this opening for black. I don't know the theory behind it, but i feel there is very limited kinetic possibility in the resulting positions. Some called this opening the king of draws. You will find no arguments here..

3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Nf3 h6




Trying to keep this bishop was useless. I didn't want to waste time chasing it around for one, and this bishop is just simply bad for another (Bad cleric, Bad!). The standard Caro-Kann formation is to put a pawn on e6. After that, its scope becomes severely limited.

We let Michael Stean Speak:

"The most important single feature of a chess position is the activity of the pieces. This is absolutely fundamental in all phases of the game. The primary constraint on piece activity is the pawn structure.."

and so, why would I help him get rid of a half-dead bishop?

7. c3 e6

He will develop the dark-squared bishop soon. Now that is the bishop I'm worried about. That is the one who have chemistry with its pawns. That bishop and his pawns are soul mates. Best-of-friends, lovers, milk and coffee. They fit one another like a bathing suit and Anna Nicole Smith. Err.. too much analogy, but you get the idea.

Anyway, viewing it this way, my next move is

8. Bf4



What else? I was hoping he'd put his own bishop on d6 and we can trade. Recognizing which pieces to trade is one of the things I'm trying to work on. Mindless hacking will not do. There must be some form of "finesse" in moves I might say (hehe!).

8. .. Bd6

What a good helper you are.

9. Bxd6 Qxd6 10. Be2

Of course not Bd3. In no way shape form or manner will I trade this bishop. This is my preciousss!!!

10. ..Nf6

11. O-O O-O 12. Re1 Nbd7 13. a4?!




I think this move in inaccurate. Now if I was him, I'd play c5! and try to break whites pawn structure. The correct move here i think is b4 to suppress that.

13 ..Nb6 14. a5 Nbd5

I was deathly afraid of c5. I was thinking he will move a5 to prevent b4 then play c5 to isolate my pawns. So I "prevented" a5 myself.

15. Qd2 Nf4

How dare you threaten my preciousss!!!

16. Bc4




There, my preciouss!!! is safe. In no way shape form or manner will I trade this bishop (preciousss!!! preciousss!!!).

I might be too late, but he should find some way to play c5 while there is still a chance. That move will put tremendous pressure on my position. He will isolate my d-pawn, and have the c-file for himself.

16. ... N4h5 17. Nxh5 Bxh5




I will not let my pawns be isolated and help him remove his problem bishop (see next move)

As a side note black is trying to win via piece play. But i think this position calls for the fabled minority attack. In fact, I'm positive the minority attack against positions like this is written in one of my chess books. That strategy is just begging to be played. Look, his bishop on g6 controls the b1 square so I couldn't even support my pawns with my rooks there. Then if he had pushed his own pawns to a5, and b5. And instead of jumping around like a headless horsey left his knight on its strong outpost d5 - cause it controls b4 (not to mention the idea of c5) - my whole queen-side suddenly becomes precarious.

Hmm, this Caro-Kann stuff is interesting after all.

18. Ne5 Ng4 19. Bd3



A very deep move if I may say so myself. Ha! An avaricious dullard will not think upon such a plan of infinite delicacy. Well not really. But why here, and why now? The reason is that he will have to bring his bishop to g6. The minute he does that i will trade bishops. But didn't i say this is a good bishop? Yes it is, but trading on g6 will give him doubled g-pawns and an isolated e-pawn. This is called trading one positional advantage for another.

I learned this from Fischer.

19 ..Nxe5 20. Rxe5 Bg6 21. Bxg6 fxg6




Well done my preciousss!!! (pats bishop in the head, bishops looks up, hangs tongue and grins happily)

I like games like this. Its almost as if my opponent is trying to help me conduct the game. I was very happy here. Almost too happy. Everything was flowing according to plan.

22. b4

At last!!! the annoying threat of c5 is gone. Mwahahahahahahaha!!!!

If there was one move I've feared throughout the game, it was that pawn break. If he was able to do that, the position will open and his chances will increase exponentially.

So kids, don't forget to study your reading, writing, ciphering, and pawn breaks ok.

22. ..Rf5

What else?

23. Rae1 Rxe5 24. Rxe5 Rf8 25. Qe3 Rf6



Now why am I so happy here? The material is equal and I am no endgame player after all. So why place my hopes on an isolated e-pawn and doubled g-pawns. These are weaknesses sure, but they are slight. Plus the queens are still on-board so its hardly just "A Matter of Technique".

The only thing i can say during times like this is "You should see the other guy".

25. Qe3 Rf6 26. c4 b6 27. axb6 axb6 28. c5 bxc5 29. bxc5 Qd7



I am simplifying as much as possible and driving the queen away from d6. Now the pawn on c6 is also weak. The thinking is, he will not be able to protect both the c-pawn and the e-pawn. One of them will fall sooner or later.

30. f4 Qf7 31. g3 g5 32. fxg5 hxg5 33. Rxg5 Rf1+ 34. Kg2 Qf6




I intend to bring my king into the battle. The more the merrier, i say. Plus, there is no way he can mate me. My own queen and rook protect me well enough.

35. Re5 Kf7 36. Qe4 Rc1 37. Kh3 Qh6+ 38. Kg4 Rc3 39. Qxc6 Qg6+



Another pawn falls. Now its just a matter of technique (Always wanted to say that). Btw, he could have taken my h-pawn a few moves back there. But I feel he will have exposed his king needlessly, rook and queen can mate a king after all. Not only are queen, rook, and enemy king such a dangerous combination - In fact its the oldest trick in the book (Or if not, I can win the c and e pawn at least).

Apparently, my opponent shared my conviction.

From here it becomes easy. I give the rest without comments

40. Rg5 Qf6 41. Qc7+ Kg8 42. Qf4 Qh6 43. h4 Qh7 44. Qe5 Kf8 45. Qxe6 Qd3 46. Qf5+ Qxf5+ 47. Rxf5+ Kg8 48. Rf3 Rc4 49. Rf4 Rc3 50. Re4 Kf7 51. Kf4 Kf6 52. g4 g6 53. Re3 Rc4 54. Ke4 g5 55. hxg5+ Kxg5 56. Kd5 Rc1 57. Re4 Rf1 58. c6 Rf6 59. Kc5 Rg6 60. c7

1-0

---

Full game scores:

[Event "rated standard match"]
[Site "freechess.org"]
[Date "2006.12.14"]
[White "Nezha"]
[Black "Gianuzio"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "1756"]
[BlackElo "1658"]
[ECO "B18"]
[TimeControl "1800+30"]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Nf3 h6 7. c3 e6 8.Bf4 Bd6 9. Bxd6 Qxd6 10. Be2 Nf6 11. O-O O-O 12. Re1 Nbd7 13. a4 Nb6 14. a5 Nbd5 15. Qd2 Nf4 16. Bc4 N4h5 17. Nxh5 Bxh5 18. Ne5 Ng4 19. Bd3 Nxe5 20. Rxe5 Bg6 21. Bxg6 fxg6 22. b4 Rf5 23. Rae1 Rxe5 24. Rxe5 Rf8 25. Qe3 Rf6 26. c4 b6 27. axb6 axb6 28. c5 bxc5 29. bxc5 Qd7 30. f4 Qf7 31. g3 g5 32. fxg5 hxg5 33.Rxg5 Rf1+ 34. Kg2 Qf6 35. Re5 Kf7 36. Qe4 Rc1 37. Kh3 Qh6+ 38. Kg4 Rc3 39.Qxc6 Qg6+ 40. Rg5 Qf6 41. Qc7+ Kg8 42. Qf4 Qh6 43. h4 Qh7 44. Qe5 Kf8 45.Qxe6 Qd3 46. Qf5+ Qxf5+ 47. Rxf5+ Kg8 48. Rf3 Rc4 49. Rf4 Rc3 50. Re4 Kf7 51.Kf4 Kf6 52. g4 g6 53. Re3 Rc4 54. Ke4 g5 55. hxg5+ Kxg5 56. Kd5 Rc1 57. Re4 Rf1 58. c6 Rf6 59. Kc5 Rg6 60. c7 1-0

Paste here Lutanho



 
posted by Nezha at 7:59 PM | Permalink |


1 Comments:


  • At 12:42 AM, Blogger JPro

    Nice game, interesting comments hehe - JavaManIssa